Read more about our study, why we've chosen Melbourne as our study area and understand why you may be sent a letter inviting you to participate.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q - Where did you get my contact details?

Q - Can I sign up to participate?

Q - Where are you recruiting?

Q - I received a letter. What now?

Q - What is the ACU link?

Q - Why only in Melbourne? Why not rural and regional places?

Q - Why specific neighbourhoods?

Q - What will you be asking of participants?

Q - Can I give my letter to someone else?

Q - What’s in it for me?

Q - What’s the DNA test about and will I get the results?

Q - What’s the MRI scan for and will I get the results?

Q - Will I get the results for the memory and thinking tests?

Q - Will doing the genetic test affect my health or life insurance policy?

Q - Where does the testing take place?

Q - Does the iMAP study have ethics approval?


Q - Where did you get my contact details?

We obtained your contact details from the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC):

“The AEC may provide Commonwealth Electoral Roll (the electoral roll) information for the purpose of conducting medical research. This is permitted under item 2 of the table in subsection 90B(4) of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (the Electoral Act). All applications for electoral roll information are governed by regulation 11 of the Electoral and Referendum Regulation 2016. It requires medical researchers to adhere to the National Health and Medical Research Council Guidelines under Section 95 of the Privacy Act 1988 (the NHMRC Guidelines).

Please visit the AEC for more information.

Your personal details will be kept private and secure at all times and only be used for the purposes of this research study. If you do not wish to participate in this research, all your personal details will be securely deleted once the recruitment period has ended.

The iMAP study was approved by the Australian Catholic University Human Research Ethics Committee. It was then assessed by the AEC and found to be suitable and valuable research for them to support, and to have the necessary safeguards in place to protect privacy. By using the electoral roll, we could identify specific people (50-79 years old), living in the targeted neighbourhoods. That’s the only information the AEC has provided us, just enough to post our letters of invitation.

Q - Can I sign up to participate?

No, if you haven’t (yet) received an invitation letter personally addressed to you then unfortunately you cannot volunteer. The iMAP study is focusing on people aged 50-79 years (who are registered to vote) living in one of our 120 target neighbourhoods.

As we cannot recruit everyone living in a target neighbourhood, a certain number of names were selected at random. We selected them at random rather than based on interest to avoid biases, such as recruiting people that are interested in the study because they are physically active.

“The AEC may provide Commonwealth Electoral Roll (the electoral roll) information for the purpose of conducting medical research. This is permitted under item 2 of the table in subsection 90B(4) of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (the Electoral Act). All applications for electoral roll information are governed by regulation 11 of the Electoral and Referendum Regulation 2016. It requires medical researchers to adhere to the National Health and Medical Research Council Guidelines under Section 95 of the Privacy Act 1988 (the NHMRC Guidelines).” Please visit this AEC page for more information.

Q - Where are you recruiting?

We are looking for participants from 120 target neighbourhoods spread over 60 Melbourne postcodes. Those areas were chosen to ensure a mix of neighbourhood walkability (how easy it is to walk around the area), pollution (particulates and gases from sources such as industry and vehicle exhausts), and socioeconomic status (based on Australian Bureau of Statistics data).

Discover the target sites on our interactive map

Q - I received a letter. What now?

Please reply to let us know you are interested in finding out more. You can get in touch by sending back the reply-paid form, emailing us, phoning us, or texting us (as you can tell, we’re keen to hear from you!) – the details are in your invitation letter. If you are interested in the study but don’t have time at the moment, please let us know and we can contact you again at a more convenient time. Even if you are not interested we would still like to hear from you – we can ensure you don’t get reminders and remove you off our contact list.

What happens if you get a letter from us

Q - What is the ACU link?

The Australian Catholic University is an increasingly prominent Australian University with campuses in Victoria, New South Wales, Queensland and Australian Capital Territory. It includes the Mary Mackillop Institute for Health Research (MMIHR), based in Melbourne. The MMIHR is a leader in international health research and is home to the iMAP study, which is currently running in three countries (Melbourne, Hong Kong, and Barcelona). There is no Catholic or religious “angle” to MMIHR or the iMAP study.

Q - Why only in Melbourne? Why not rural and regional places?

Melbourne is a vibrant and liveable international city and an excellent base for the iMAP study. It’s also home to the MMIHR. So why not Melbourne?!

Are you asking why not elsewhere in Victoria? That’s a great question. Regional cities and rural areas are on our radar, but we had to have current and suitable pollution, socioeconomic and walkability data to choose the neighbourhoods to focus upon. That information is not currently available for many areas outside the capital city. And we have to start somewhere! Hopefully, we can later expand the study outside Melbourne.

Are you asking why not other cities? We are already managing simultaneous arms to the iMAP study in Hong Kong and Barcelona. We are also in negotiation with other researchers in Australia and internationally who are interested in using our methodology to run an iMAP study in their own city.

Q - Why specific neighbourhoods?

We have chosen 120 neighbourhoods across Melbourne. A “neighbourhood” is based on the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ (ABS) Statistical Area level 1 (SA1). An SA1 has a population of around 400 individuals; with about 10,000 SA1s in Melbourne. We chose 120 SA1s based on existing data on particulate air pollution (particulates are very fine “chunks” in the air from industry, transport, etc.), walkability (how easy it is to be a pedestrian around the neighbourhood), and community socioeconomic status (average household income). The 120 selected areas consist of mixtures of high and low levels of each of these three features, giving us a good representation of residents and neighbourhoods.

Search an interactive map of the target sites

Q - What will you be asking of participants?

The iMAP study is a very comprehensive study – it needs to have international significance and to provide the answers we are seeking about factors involved in cognitive health, especially cognitive decline associated with ageing.

We are asking participants to come into the testing centre (Level 5, 215 Spring St, Melbourne) for a 90-120 minute session that includes an interview, a series of thinking and memory tasks, a saliva sample for DNA, and measurement of attributes such as height and balance. We then provide participants with four small devices to wear during the following week to collect information on sleep, activity, time spent sitting, and where they go. After that, participants come back for another 90-120 minute interview about their neighbourhood and other places they regularly visit and what they do there.

Half of the participants then volunteer to get an MRI scan of their brain. Then we do it all again two years later to look for changes.

So yes, it is a big commitment, but it’s a couple of intensive periods rather than a long-term engagement. And you do get something in return.

Q - Can I give my letter to someone else?

No, it is important for the integrity of the iMAP study that the specific people we have chosen are those on whom we collect data. Actually, it’s not specifically about you; our randomisation process chose you – it might equally have chosen someone in the house next door to you or over your back fence. This means people cannot volunteer purely because they are interested in the study. It also means you cannot pass your letter to someone else among your family or friends, and you cannot help us by recruiting your friends. However, we are keen to hear from others with an interest in the topic because there will be other related studies coming up. If you are interested (and did receive a letter addressed to you), but don’t have the time right now, please get back to us anyway and we can discuss when a better time might be.

Q - What’s in it for me?

First of all, we give all participants who sign up a snazzy, exclusive and limited edition iMAP fridge magnet! We’ll also give you a $50 gift voucher at the end of the second testing session, with another $50 in 2 years’ time after the second round of data collection. There will be an extra 2 lots of $30 if you sign up for 2 MRI scans, also 2 years apart. A potential total of $160 – plus the fridge magnet!

We’ll also give you a report on your physical activity, sitting and sleep patterns from the monitoring week.

And finally, you will have the satisfaction of knowing you’ve made a vital contribution to a major international research study on a very important and current topic that affects us all. (And you’ll help us beat Hong Kong and Barcelona in our friendly little recruitment competition.)

Q - What’s the DNA test about and will I get the results?

There’s a protein called Apolipoprotein E (Apo-E) that plays a range of roles in the human body. The APOE gene (part of your DNA) is an element of the control mechanism for how that protein is manufactured and deployed. There are 3 versions of that gene. One of those variants appears to be implicated in the development of diseases like Alzheimer’s disease.

Read about the APOE gene

We will use a DNA test to discover which version of the APOE gene you have. It will be just one of the bits of data we will be analysing. We’ll take your DNA via a saliva sample you simply spit into a tube.

Having the particular gene variant does not necessarily mean you will develop Alzheimer’s disease. It is a risk factor, like smoking and lack of physical activity also seem to be risk factors. Further, knowing you have the gene won’t change anything since you can’t alter your DNA. But you can do something about other risk factors like smoking and sedentary behaviour! And finally, the science is not yet good enough to know how big a risk factor this gene variant is – it certainly can’t be used to diagnose or even provide an early warning of Alzheimer’s disease. Thus, it is currently used more as a research tool. Taking all of this together, we will not inform participants which gene variant they have. This is common practice in research studies. The information we give you about your activity levels, how much sitting you do and how well you sleep will be vastly more useful to you as health information.

Q - What is the MRI scan for and will I get the results?

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses magnetic fields and radio waves to image the inside of the body without the need for radiation such as x-rays. So long as metal is not brought near the scanner (including metal within the body), it is considered a safe procedure. We will be using MRI to examine brain structure and evidence of past events like microbleeds, which can be implicated in cognitive decline and conditions like dementia. We will be particularly interested in any physiological changes between the MRI scans two years apart that might be linked to changes in thinking and memory abilities. The scans will not be used for diagnostic purposes, but they will make the iMAP study more comprehensive. We will not be giving you a copy of your MRI scans because you can’t really do anything with them. However, a qualified radiologist at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (part of the Royal Children’s Hospital, where we have elected to have the MRI scans done) will look your scans over before we add them to our data. In the unlikely event that anything of concern is noticed, you will be contacted to discuss it.

Q - Will I get the results for the memory and thinking tasks?

We will ask you to complete a range of memory and thinking tasks during the first testing session (and then two years later to see if there are any changes). Knowing the results for any of those tests is of little value from a diagnostic point of view. A health professional testing memory and thinking, in order to make a clinical diagnosis, might use these or similar tests, but they would be part of a larger set of tests and other measures – they wouldn’t rely on results from individual tests. So, because the results for these tests are mostly meaningless to you, but very important for us as a piece of data, we won’t be providing the results.

Q - Will doing the genetic test affect my health or life insurance policy?

No. Whilst genetic testing can provide a wealth of information, we are only collecting your APOE gene variant. The results of this test will not be provided to anyone.

Q - Where does the testing take place?

We are located on Level 5, 215 Spring St, Melbourne; near the intersection with Lonsdale St, directly opposite Parliament Station.

Find us on a map

Q - Does the iMAP study have ethics approval?

The iMAP study was granted research ethics approval by the ACU Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) in October 2018 – HREC number 2018-191H.

 

The logo of the ACU Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research

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Level 5, 215 Spring Street,
Melbourne, VIC, 3000

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