Students and COVID-19

Please formally notify ACU that you are in isolation by filling in the ACU reporting form for students.

Please formally notify ACU that you are in isolation by filling in the ACU reporting form for students.

Staff and COVID-19 reporting

Please formally notify ACU that you are in isolation by filling in the ACU reporting form for staff. Once your form is submitted, the university will contact you to discuss arrangements including working remotely and/or relevant leave.

Please formally notify ACU that you are in isolation by filling in the ACU reporting form for staff. Once your form is submitted, the university will contact you to discuss arrangements including working remotely and/or relevant leave.

I am a supervisor and a staff member or student has contacted me about self-isolation or diagnosis, what do I tell them?

Please ask them to formally notify ACU that they are in isolation by filling in the ACU reporting form for staff. Once their form is submitted, the university will contact them to discuss arrangements including working remotely and/or relevant leave.

Medical advice

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that can make humans and animals sick. They cause illnesses that can range from the common cold to more severe diseases. Coronavirus (COVID-19) was first reported in December 2019 in Wuhan City in China.

Practising good hygiene measures and physical distancing is the best defence against most viruses. You should:

  • wash your hands regularly for 20 to 30 seconds;
  • use a hand sanitiser with at least 60 per cent alcohol, if soap and water is not available. Hand sanitiser does not replace washing your hands after using the bathroom;
  • always use soap and water if your hands are visibly soiled;
  • avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth;
  • cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing and sneezing or cough into your elbow;
  • dispose of used tissues into a bin immediately and wash your hands afterwards;
  • keep a distance of 1.5 metres between yourself and other people;
  • avoid crowds and large public gatherings;
  • avoid shaking hands, hugging, or kissing other people; and
  • keep connected with others, including colleagues, friends and family, through phone, email, social media, and online work platforms when possible.

There is evidence that the virus spreads from person-to-person. The virus is most likely spread through:

  • close contact with an infectious person
  • contact with droplets from an infected person’s cough or sneeze
  • touching objects or surfaces (like doorknobs or tables) that have cough or sneeze droplets from an infected person, and then touching your mouth or face.

You may be asked to isolate in your home if you have been diagnosed with COVID-19 or if you have come into close contact with a confirmed case (as defined above).

People who must be isolated should stay in their home and avoid public places, in particular work, school, childcare or university. Only people who usually live in your home or other place of residence should be permitted on the premises. Do not allow visitors into the home or residence.

If you have contracted COVID-19 and you are sharing your home with others, you should stay in a different room from other people or be separated as much as possible. Wear a surgical mask when you are in the same room as another person, and when seeking medical care. Use a separate bathroom, if available.

If you are self-isolating for either reason, make sure that you do not share a room with people who are at risk of severe disease, such as elderly people and those who have heart, lung or kidney conditions, and diabetes. Where possible, get others such as friends or family, who are not required to be isolated, to get food or other necessities for you.

If the university semester has started, you should notify your lecturer or supervisor of your circumstance to determine whether alternate arrangements for remote learning or working can be temporarily put in place.

If you must leave the home or residence, for example to seek medical care, you should wear a surgical mask if you have one.

If a member of your household is in isolation, you do not need to do the same unless they or you have developed symptoms.

Symptoms include (but are not limited to) fever, cough, sore throat, fatigue and shortness of breath.

If you develop symptoms (fever, a cough, sore throat, tiredness or shortness of breath), you should arrange to see a doctor for an urgent assessment and avoid coming to campus. Testing can be ordered by your GP, or at a hospital emergency department.

You should telephone the health clinic or hospital before you arrive and advise of your travel history or whether you have been in contact with a confirmed case of coronavirus.

Your doctor will liaise with Public Health authorities to manage your care. You must remain isolated either in your home or a healthcare setting until Public Health authorities inform you it is safe to return to your usual activities.

The Department of Health recommends people who have been in close contact with any confirmed COVID-19 cases be isolated in their home for 14 days following exposure. Close contact is defined as requiring:

  • greater than 15 minutes face-to-face contact in any setting with a confirmed case in the period extending from 24 hours before onset of symptoms in the confirmed case, or
  • sharing of a closed space with a confirmed case for a prolonged period (e.g. more than two hours) in the period extending from 24 hours before onset of symptoms in the confirmed case.

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