The Bachelor of Nutrition Science (Honours) is a one-year full-time (or equivalent part-time) program for students who have already completed a relevant Bachelor degree. The program provides students with the opportunity to apply knowledge gained in their bachelor degree in a specific context within the field of Nutrition Science. Students will be able to explore and engage in the research process in detail, immerse themselves in a research project and write a thesis. The program will provide students with a pathway to further postgraduate studies including research. See below for a list of research projects available on our Melbourne and North Sydney campuses.

Nutrition Science Proposed Honours Project

Dietary acculturation is a phenomenon that see changes in dietary habits following migration. The changes effect both migrants and their host cultures. Australia is a multicultural nation with two-thirds of the population born overseas. Following on from work already completed to assess/measure dietary acculturation in Australian migrants, this project will extend understanding of the mechanisms and impacts of dietary acculturation in migrant groups to Australia, and its effect on health. Data will be collected through structured interviews and focus groups using both quantitative and qualitative research methods. This research will inform approaches to addressing food-related health issues for health professionals in practice.

Supervisor: Sharon Croxford & Emma Stirling

Contact: Sharon.croxford@acu.edu.au

Campus: Melbourne and North Sydney

Building on a small project in 2016, this project aims to further explore the changes in culinary publications in relation to changes in the cultural diversity in Australia. Australia has a long history of migration with various groups migrating in significant numbers over the past 70-80 years. At the same time Australia has a strong history of culinary publications in newspapers, magazines and food and cook books. The project aims to bring these themes together to analyse culinary publications from a multicultural perspective and to explore representation of culture through these texts.

Supervisor: Sharon Croxford & Emma Stirling

Contact: Sharon.croxford@acu.edu.au

Campus: Melbourne and North Sydney

Culinary texts documenting ingredients and recipes have been produced in Australia for more than 150 years. The diet of Indigenous Australians prior to the arrival of Europeans consisted of a rich variety of native animals and plants. The diet of Europeans consisted of imported foods of limited variety, yet they did not enrich their supplies through exploitation of the locally available foods. The aim of the project is to explore the representation of native foods within culinary texts over the past 150 years.

Supervisor: Sharon Croxford & Emma Stirling

Contact: Sharon.croxford@acu.edu.au

Campus: Melbourne and North Sydney

Melbourne (and Victoria) is known for its multiculturalism, with the majority of migrants in Australia living in Victoria. While there is a lag between the settlement of a new migrant group and established access to foods from the migrant groups traditional culinary culture, inevitably food stores, cafes and restaurants become open in areas where the migrant group settles. The aim of this project is to evaluate whether ‘ethnic’ eating establishments in neighbourhoods affect people’s perception of that ‘ethnic’ culture and cuisine. Do they help to build cultural literacy or tolerance? Do they help to establish social cohesion? Can they help to break down barriers? This research will start to answer some these questions.

Supervisor: Sharon Croxford & Emma Stirling

Contact: Sharon.croxford@acu.edu.au

Campus: Melbourne and North Sydney

Knowledge and skills in culinary arts is increasingly recognised as an important area of study for students in human nutrition science degrees in order to take advantage of emerging opportunities within industries that are looking for graduates with culinary, food and nutrition science expertise. Undergraduate nutrition science degrees have traditionally attracted students with an interest in food and nutrition from a dietary intervention perspective with varying levels of interest and literacy in the culinary arts. Through the development of a purpose-built survey, the project will collect baseline data from 1st years nutrition science students to measure their culinary science literacy.

Supervisor: Sharon Croxford & Emma Stirling

Contact: Sharon.croxford@acu.edu.au

Campus: Melbourne and North Sydney

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