2009

Investigators:

Dr Gail Winkworth, Vicky Saunders, Lorraine Thomson

Funding Source:

Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs

Aim:

Although there is some evidence about how the Family Relationship Services Program (FRSP) works in practice and with which groups, it is less clear how they work with more diverse and complex client groups. This project aimed to review the processes and models of collaborative practice currently in use by Family Relationship Service Providers in working with state child protection agencies, and to identify the likely impacts of these practices, processes and models on the safety and well-being of children.

Working Across the Grey

Investigators:

Dr Gail Winkworth, Megan Layton-Thompson

Aim:

Through a partnership between ICPS and early childhood and family support services, this project aimed to improve the social connectedness and capability of vulnerable and hard to reach parents, and the safety and life chances of their very young children in Inner North Canberra.

This research extended the knowledge base for services working with vulnerable families with young children, to enable a clearer understanding of how to increase their capability and social connectedness, and increase the capability of early childhood and family services to work collaboratively to better support such families.

Communities for Children Evaluation

Investigators:

Prof Morag McArthur, Stella Conroy, and Kate Butler

Aim:

The Communities for Children (C4C) project, a Commonwealth funded initiative, focused on children aged 0-5 years and their families in North Canberra, and sought to ensure greater opportunities for children to grow and thrive in their local community.

The Canberra C4C project was facilitated by Northside Community Services, and the Institute was appointed as the external evaluator for the project.

Outputs:

Research monographs

McArthur, M., Conroy, S., & Butler, K. (2009). Connecting Canberra's Inner North - Final Evaluation of the North Canberra C4C Initiative. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.  

Winkworth, G., & Layton-Thompson, M. (2009). Working in the Grey: Increasing Collaboration between services in Inner North Canberra – A Communities for Children Project. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Associated publications

Winkworth, G., McArthur, M., Layton, M., Thomson, L., & Wilson, F. (2010). Opportunities Lost - Why Some Parents of Young Children Are Not Well-Connected to the Service Systems Designed to Assist Them. Australian Social Work, 63(4).

Winkworth, G., McArthur, M., Layton, M., & Thomson, L. (2010). Someone to check in one me: Social capital, social support and vulnerable parents with very young children in the Australian Capital Territory. Child & Family Social Work, 15, 206-215.

Investigators:

Paul Chesterton, Kate Butler, Prof Morag McArthur

Funding Source:

Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs

Aim:

This evaluation focused on six clearinghouses with an emphasis on the overall operation of the clearinghouses. Key elements of the evaluation included the clearinghouses' circumstances, functions, links, design, processes, outcomes, performance measures, and interaction with FaHCSIA. Other clearinghouses and means of transferring knowledge and disseminating information was examined to inform consideration of good practice and of alternatives. The evaluation was undertaken within the context of the information needs of the various target populations.

Outputs:

Chesterton, P., & Butler, B. (2009). Evaluation of FaHCSIA Funded Clearinghouses. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Investigators:

Kate Butler, Prof Morag McArthur, Dr Gail Winkworth, Vicky Saunders, Megan Layton-Thompson, Stella Conroy, Renee Crowe, Wendy Rollins

Funding Source:

Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs

Aim:

This study aimed to develop a deeper understanding of the kinds of social resources used by parents, what their needs were for services and the reasons why some were not connected to formal support. Through interviews and focus groups with 80 parents, it sought to answer the following research questions:

  • How do families who are in receipt of income support identify their needs?
  • What formal and informal supports do parents currently draw on?
  • What are their experiences of accessing and utilising formal support service?

Outputs:

Research monograph

Butler, K., McArthur, M., Winkworth, G., Saunders, V., Layton-Thompson, M., Conroy, S., Crowe, R., & Rollins, W. (2009). Getting what we need: Families' experiences of services. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Associated publications

Barker, J., & Thomson, L. (2015). Helpful relationships with service users: Linking social capital. Australian Social Work, 68(1), 130 - 145.

McArthur, M., Thomson, L., & Winkworth, G. (2013). Jumping through hoops - the cost of compliance on sole parents. Child & Family Social Work, 18(2), 159-167.

Butler, K., McArthur, M., Thomson, L., & Winkworth, G. (2012). Vulnerable Families' Use of Services: Getting What They Need. Australian Social Work, 65(4), 575-581.

Investigators:

Prof Morag McArthur, Dr Gail Winkworth, Vicky Saunders, Dr Tim Moore

Funding Source:

Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs

Aim:

This research project aimed to scope the boundaries and possible methodologies of future research with children and young people regarding their experience of separation and divorce in ways that enabled children to participate directly in a sensitive, ethical and effective manner.

Outputs:

Institute of Child Protection Studies. (2009). Separation and divorce: Researching with Children. Literature Review. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Investigators:

Vicky Saunders, Dr Tim Moore, Kate Butler, Bev Orr, Prof Morag McArthur

Funding Source:

ACT Community Services Directorate

Aim:

The ACT Youth Services Program (YSP) was coordinated by the Office for Children, Youth and Family Support and funded a range of community-based services for young people until March 2012.

The program delivered services through youth centres, and a range of youth development and youth support activities. This Project provided an overview of what works for vulnerable young people aged 12-25 years, in order to inform the future direction of the YSP.

Outputs:

Saunders, V., Moore, T., Butler, K., McArthur, M., & Orr, B. (2009). ACT Youth Services Program: Future Directions. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Investigators:

Kate Butler, Prof Morag McArthur

Funding Source:

ACT Government

Aim:

There is increasing recognition that early intervention has the potential to improve outcomes for children aged 0-8 years. This project provided the ACT Government with a typology of early intervention based on available evidence, an analysis of current investment in early intervention programs, and recommendations for future early intervention investments.

2008

Investigators:

Dr Tim Moore, Fiona Dempster, Prof Morag McArthur

Funding Source:

Carer Recognition Grants Program

Aim:

This project explored the lived experiences, nature of care responsibilities, support needs and service responses to children, young people and families affected by alcohol and other drugs. Working in collaboration with local young carer service, CYCLOPS ACT, ICPS re-analysed data from a previous study, interviewed young people and stakeholders, and worked with peer leaders to determine how to best meet the needs of these families.

Outputs:

Research monograph

Noble-Carr, D., Moore, T., & McArthur, M. (2008). Who Cares? Experiences of young people living with a family member who has an alcohol or other drug issue. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Associated publications

Moore, T., McArthur, M., & Noble-Carr, D. (2011). Different but the same? Exploring the experiences of young people caring for a parent with an alcohol or other drug issue. Journal of Youth Studies, 14(2), 161-177.

Investigators:

Dr Tim Moore, Tracy Cussen, Vicky Saunders, Prof Morag McArthur

Funding Source:

ACT Community Services Directorate

Aim:

Reintegration of young offenders has been shown to be as important in determining future outcomes and in reducing recidivism as incarceration itself. This project looked at the experiences of young people engaged in the juvenile justice system in the ACT at key points during their incarceration and after they left Quamby Youth Detention Centre to determine how successful the models of support were in assisting reintegration and in identifying areas of improvement for the systems surrounding young people.

Outputs:

Research monograph

Moore, T., Saunders, V., & McArthur, M. (2008). Lost in transition: Young people's transitions from custody to the community. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Associated publications

Moore, T., McArthur, M., & Saunders, V. (2013). Young People Talk about Transitioning from Youth Detention to the Community: Making Good. Australian Social Work, 66(3), 328-343.

Funding Source:

Relationships Australia

Aim:

The Relationships Australia Canberra and Riverina (RACR) counselling program aimed to improve relationships for individuals, couples and families. This evaluation assessed the extent to which the program achieved its goals and addressed the priority areas identified in the strategic plan.

Key elements of the evaluation included: analysis of the use of the program by individuals, couples and families, including the number of sessions they attended and their overall demographics; assessing clients' views as to the effectiveness (accessibility, appropriateness and responsiveness) of the program; understanding key stakeholders views about the program; and working with staff to explore their views as to what is in place or needs to be in place an effective service.

Outputs:

Saunders, V., McArthur, M., Thomson, L., & Woodward, M. (2008). Relationships Australia Counselling Program Evaluation. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Investigators:

Prof Morag McArthur, Dr Gail Winkworth

Funding Source:

Australian Association of Social Workers

Aim:

ICPS was invited to draft the submission by the Australian Association of Social Workers to the Queensland Review of qualifications and training pathways. The submission that was developed called for a national approach to workforce planning strategies for attracting, training and retaining staff and accredited courses in child protection at the post graduate levels.

Outputs:

Australian Association of Social Workers. (2008). Submission by the AASW: Review of the Qualifications and Training Pathways Department of Child Safety Queensland. AASW.

Investigators:

Dr Gail Winkworth

Funding Source:

Australian Association of Social Workers

Aim:

ICPS was invited to draft the submission by the Australian Association of Social Workers for the Inquiry into Child Protection Services in NSW. The submission argues the need for far reaching change that results in a renewed focus on children in their families and their communities and which includes not only the protection of children in danger, but the wider perspectives of well-being, prevention, therapy, family and community capacity building and social inclusion.

Outputs:

Australian Association of Social Workers. (2008). Submission by the AASW: For the Special Commission of Inquiry into Child Protection Services in NSW. AASW.

Investigators:

Lorraine Thomson

Funding Source:

Australian Association of Social Workers

Aim:

ICPS was contracted by the AASW to develop guidelines and a resources document for child well-being, and protection content and accreditation standards in social work education programs. This project was undertaken through a process of telephone consultations with a range of stakeholders and was submitted to AASW in December 2008.

Investigators:

Kate Butler, Lorraine Thomson

Funding Source:

CatholicCare Canberra and Goulburn

Aim:

The CatholicCare STEPS program, funded by ACT Health, was established in 2008 to provide a 24-hour supported accommodation facility in Canberra for young people aged 14 - 18 years, who had a diagnosed mental illness and were at risk of being admitted to hospital for acute psychiatric treatment.

ICPS developed an evaluation framework for the program involving consultations, testing and refinement of the framework.

Outputs:

Thomson, L., Butler, K., & McArthur, M. (2008). Centacare STEPS Program Evaluation Framework. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Investigators:

Dr Gail Winkworth, Prof Morag McArthur

Funding Source:

Centrelink

Aim:

The Murray Darling Basin experienced the effects of a prolonged drought. Many irrigators were reaching a critical point in the decision-making as to the long-term liability of their business, both economically and environmentally.

ICPS developed an Evaluation Framework to enable Centrelink to report on its progress in contributing to the following outcomes: better service co-ordination and improved access to services for irrigators, farmers and small businesses, workers and industry in severe financial difficulty; and increased community resilience and capacity to deal with the social consequences of change and Centrelink's ability to better inform and influence policy development.

Outputs:

Winkworth, G., & McArthur, M. (2008). Murray Darling Basin Initiative Focused Literature Review. Canberra: Australian Government.

Funding Source:

Lifeline Canberra

Aim:

ICPS assisted Lifeline Canberra to undertake an evaluation of the First Responders - Emerging Suicide Helpers (FRESH) program and Mental Health Ambassadors program.

Outputs:

Lifeline Canberra, & Institute of Child Protection Studies. (2008). First Responders - Emerging Suicide Helpers (FRESH) Evaluation Report. Canberra: Lifeline Canberra.

Investigators:

Kate Butler

Funding Source:

Mental Health Foundation ACT

Aim:

The Mental Health Carers Peer Support Groups provided information and support to people caring for family members with a mental illness. ICPS conducted an evaluation of this program in order to document how the project was developed and implemented, and to ascertain the level of satisfaction and benefits for carers participating in peer support groups.

Outputs:

Butler, K. (2008). Mental Health Carers Peer Support Group Project Evaluation Report. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

2007

Investigators:

Dr Gail Winkworth, Prof Morag McArthur

Funding Source:

Attorney-General's Department

Aim:

In late 2006, the Attorney General's Department contracted ICPS to undertake a consultative process with the first 15 of the Family Relationship Centres and all sites delivering the Family Relationships Advice Line to inform the second iteration of the Screening and Assessment Practice Framework and Guidelines (the Screening and Assessment Framework).

The consultation sought to explore:

  • The extent to which the guidelines are effective in assisting staff to determine service user needs, assess risk and achieve effective referrals;
  • To determine any variation in effectiveness of the guidelines in diverse settings (remote-rural) or with different service user groups;
  • The changes required to ensure the experience of practice changes to the Screening and Assessment Framework for use by Centres; and,
  • The training needs of Centre staff.

Outputs:

Winkworth, G., & McArthur, M. (2009). A practice framework to guide screening and assessment in the Australia Family Relationship Centres and Advice Line. Child & Family Social Work,14(4), 410-419.

Investigators:

Dr Tim Moore, Ros Morrow

Funding Source:

Carers WA

Aim:

This report presents findings from the Young Carers Roundtable in July 2007. It investigates the four key areas of identification, education, respite and whole of government approaches to supporting young carers and their families and provides a series of recommendations.

Outputs:

Moore, T., & Morrow, R. (2007). Hopping off the Roundabout - Supporting Young Carers in Western Australia. Report of findings from the Young Carers Roundtable in 2007. WA: Carers WA.

Investigators:

Dr Tim Moore, Debbie Noble-Carr, Prof Morag McArthur

Funding Source:

ACT Community Services Directorate

Aim:

This research proposal aimed to fill an important gap in our understanding of children's experience of homelessness. Previously researchers have relied almost exclusively on adults when collecting data about children's thoughts, feelings and experiences. Interviewing children, however, provides an opportunity to gain insights on the issues affecting their lives.

This project aimed to explore the following questions:

  • What are the experiences of homelessness from the child's perspective, including their school experience?
  • What are the impacts of homelessness on children's social and emotional development?
  • What is the relationship between homelessness and child protection services?
  • What are the service and policy implications of these experiences?

Outputs:

Research monographs

Moore, T., Noble-Carr, D., McArthur, M. (2007). Finding Their Way Home: Children's Experiences of Homelessness. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Noble-Carr, D. (2007). Engaging Children in Research on Sensitive Issues. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Noble-Carr, D. (2007). The Experiences and Effects of Family Homelessness for Children. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Associated publications

Moore, T., Noble-Carr, D., & Barry, E. (2014). Child-Centred Practice. Research to Practice Series, Issue 7, September. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Moore, T., & McArthur, M. (2011). "Good for Kids": Children who have been homeless talk about school. Australian Journal of Education, 55(2), 147-160.

Moore, T., McArthur, M., & Noble-Carr, D. (2011). Lessons learned from children who have experienced homelessness: What services need to know. Children and Society, 25(2), 115-126.

Moore, T., McArthur, M., & Noble-Carr, D. (2008). Down the hard road: young people and their experiences of homelessness as children. Parity, July.

Moore, T., McArthur, M., & Noble-Carr, D. (2008). Stuff you'd never think of: Children talk about homelessness and how they'd like to be supported. Family Matters, 78.

Moore, T., McArthur, M., & Noble-Carr, D. (2008). Too important to ignore: Children's views on homelessness. Parity, 21(8), 20-21

Investigators:

Lorraine Thomson, Prof Morag McArthur

Funding Source:

Foster Care Association of the ACT

Aim:

This mixed-method study focused on former carers' reasons for leaving. It involved a survey of ACT foster carers, who had ceased fostering from January 2007 until April 2007; and semi-structured interviews with twelve former carers which provided a more in-depth understanding of their experience of finishing as foster carers. It also involved interviews with representatives from a range of organisations involved in fostering in ACT to identify their views as to why carers may have ceased fostering.

Outputs:

Research monograph

Thomson, L., & McArthur, M. (2007). Experiences of Former Foster Carers. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Associated publications

Thomson, L., & McArthur, M. (2009). Who's in our family? An application of the theory of family boundary ambiguity to the experiences of former foster carers. Adoption and Fostering Journal, 33(1) 68-79.

Thomson, L., & McArthur, M. (2010). Foster Carer Experiences of Leaving Foster Care in the Australian Capital Territory. Communities, Children and Families Australia, 5(2), 48-59.

Investigators:

Prof Peter Camilleri, Chris Healy, Elspeth Macdonald, Susan Nicholls, Jolyon Sykes, Dr Gail Winkworth, Merrilyn Woodward

Funding Source:

Emergency Management Australia, and Mental Health ACT

Aim:

This research project looked at aspects of the recovery process following the January 2003 bushfire in Canberra. The research was undertaken by a multidisciplinary team drawn from the Australian Catholic University, University of Canberra and the ACT Government.

Outputs:

Research monograph

Camilleri, P., Healy, C., Macdonald, E., Nicholls, S., Sykes, J., Winkworth, G., & Woodward, M. (2007). Recovering from the 2003 Canberra bushfire: A work in progress. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Associated publications

Winkworth, G., Healy, C., Woodward, M., & Camilleri, P. (2009). Community capacity building: Learning from the 2003 bushfires. Australian Journal of Emergency Management, 24(2), 5-12.

Investigators:

Prof Morag McArthur, Lyndall Evans

Funding Source:

ACT Education and Training Directorate

Aim:

The Student Services Practice Framework aimed to work collaboratively to create more responsive, flexible and integrated services that were proactive and targeted to meet the needs of students in schools. ICPS developed the Evaluation Framework for the program.

Outputs:

McArthur, M., & Evans, L. (2007). Student Support Services Evaluation Framework. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Investigators:

Dr Tim Moore, Debbie Noble-Carr, Prof Morag McArthur

Funding Source:

Lifeline ACT

Aim:

Lifeline ACT engaged ICPS to develop a 2-day Emergency Readiness training program, and a 3-day Train the Trainer program for trainers delivering the program.

The program was aimed at a range of staff and volunteers who provided personal support to people affected by disaster. It consisted of training modules in the modern context of disaster, the psychological and social effects of disaster, disaster phases, meeting people's needs in the aftermath of disaster and communication skills to meet these needs, personal support for children and young people, outreach strategies, and self care strategies when working in a disaster environment.

Investigators:

Lorraine Thomson, Prof Morag McArthur

Funding Source:

Disability ACT

Aim:

Disability ACT engaged ICPS to develop an evaluation framework for the Family-centred Flexible Response Model (AFFIRM) program. The AFFIRM program supports families of children and young people aged 10-20 years with a disability who have high and complex needs.

The initial development of the framework was undertaken by a working group from Disability ACT, Family Based Respite Care Inc (FaBRiC) and ICPS in consultation with the AFFIRM Steering Committee/Panel. The first stage of the evaluation framework design involved the development of a project logic, the purposes of the evaluation and agreed indicators of outcomes and other performance measures. The second stage involved the testing of the framework during the early months of AFFIRM's operation and the refinement of the framework using the information gained from this trial period.

Outputs:

McArthur, M., & Thompson, L. (2007). Evaluation Framework for 'A family-centred flexible intensive response model': Affirm. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Investigators:

Chris Healy, Prof Morag McArthur, Greg Smith, Dr Gail Winkworth

Funding Source:

Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs

Aim:

FaHCSIA contracted ICPS to develop an Evaluation Framework to guide the evaluation of recovery assistance across all hazards, disaster recovery situations, and a whole of Australian Government evaluation of the disaster recovery assistance arrangements for Tropical Cyclone Larry, taking into account existing completed evaluation work.

The evaluation was a means of testing the efficacy of the draft disaster recovery assistance evaluation framework. The literature review examined literature on the effects of disasters on individuals, communities and the social environment, with particular consideration given to vulnerable groups such as those on low incomes, the unemployed and people with little or no insurance, vulnerable women and children, the aged and those who lived in remote Indigenous communities.

Outputs:

Healy, C., McArthur, M., Smith, G., & Winkworth, G. (2007). Evaluation Framework: Australian Government Disaster Assistance Package. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Winkworth, G. (2007). Disaster Recovery, a Review of the Literature. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Investigators:

Prof Morag McArthur, Vicky Saunders, Bindi Bennett

Funding Source:

Marymead Child and Family Centre

Aim:

The purpose of this project was to develop a greater understanding of the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in the ACT. Commissioned by Marymead Child and Family Centre, it sought to inform the development of an Indigenous family support program.

The project presented a review of relevant family support research literature and existing data and program information. Interviews were conducted with key stakeholders such as Indigenous communities, Indigenous families and key agencies to identify the range of needs and possible support interventions for Indigenous families. To ensure that this service was culturally appropriate, the project was guided by an Indigenous project officer.

Outputs:

McArthur, M., Bennett, B., & Saunders, V. (2007). What do Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families living in the ACT need in a family support program? Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Investigators:

Dr Tim Moore, Lorraine Thomson

Funding Source:

ACT Community Services Directorate

Aim:

The Office for Children, Youth and Family Support coordinated the Youth Services Program (YSP) in the ACT until March 2012, funding a range of community-based services for young people aged 12 - 25. In 2007, the Institute conducted two one-day consultations for OCYFS in order to help explore the strengths, challenges and the gaps in services of the YSP and to identify key priorities for the future.

Investigators:

Dr Tim Moore, Bindi Bennett, Greg Ryan, Chelsea Yarrie, Jad King, Saul Sambono, Prof Morag McArthur

Funding Source:

ACT Community Services Directorate

Aim:

This project aimed to enhance service delivery responses for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people in the out-of-home-care system by gathering young people's views on their experiences within the service system and strategies for development. Young people and service providers were engaged in youth forums, an out-of-home-care conference and a cultural gathering and through individual and group interviews. The project was supported by an Indigenous worker and a group of youth leaders employed to guide and co-facilitate the process.

Outputs:

Moore, T., Bennett, B., & McArthur, M. (2007). They've Gotta Listen: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Young People in Out Of Home Care. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Investigators:

Lorraine Thomson, Dr Gail Winkworth, Lyndall Evans

Funding Source:

Marymead Child and Family Centre

Aim:

In 2006, Marymead received funding from the ACT Office for Children, Youth and Family Support to provide a range of in-home services to families called the 'Families Together' program.

Marymead has been providing similar family support services for a number of years. Following an initial evaluation of the program undertaken as a student project, the Families Together program staff commissioned ICPS to assist them to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. This evaluation considered both the intensive and family support components of the Families Together program.

Outputs:

Thomson, L., McArthur, M., Winkworth, G., Saunders, V., & Evans, L. (2007). Evaluation of 'Families Together' Program. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

2006

Investigators:

Dr Gail Winkworth, Prof Morag McArthur, Debbie Noble-Carr, Megan Layton-Thompson

Funding Source:

ACT Education and Training Directorate

Aim:

ICPS developed a conceptual framework for collaborative approaches and integrated service delivery, and worked with the Department to develop these concepts within the organisation. This included staff forums and a 'world cafe' with central district principals. A small qualitative research project was undertaken to gather the views of people who worked collaboratively and to identify good practice examples.

Outputs:

Winkworth, G., Layton-Thompson, M., Noble-Carr, D., & McArthur, M. (2006). A report on the multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of student services: ACT Department of Education and Training. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Investigators:

Dr Gail Winkworth, Prof Morag McArthur

Funding Source:

Attorney-General's Department

Aim:

The Australian Attorney-General's Department contracted ICPS to develop the practice framework for screening and assessment in the Family Relationship Centres and Family Relationship Advice Line.

This project involved writing a research report which provided an evidence base for the practice framework, consultations with expert practitioners, the development of a practice framework and practice guide for screening and assessment, and testing the suitability of the framework and guide with workers in the family relationships field.

Outputs:

Winkworth, G., & McArthur, M. (2006). Framework for Screening, Assessment and Referrals in Family Relationship Centres and the Family Relationship Advice Line. Canberra: Australian Government.

Investigators:

Dr Tim Moore, Merrilyn Woodward, Prof Morag McArthur

Funding Source:

ACT Education and Training Directorate

Aim:

This review of the Youth Support Workers in Schools initiative was commissioned by the ACT Department of Education and Training in October 2005. The review's broad aim was to identify the initial successes of the initiative, as well as the factors that have acted to both enable and restrict positive outcomes, and to present strategies to enhance and develop the initiative.

The research design included: literature review; surveys of youth support workers, principals and other school executive; focus groups with youth support workers; and interviews with District Coordinators in the program.

Outputs:

Institute of Child Protection Studies. (2006). Review of the Youth Support Workers in Schools Initiative. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Investigators:

Prof Morag McArthur, Dr Gail Winkworth

Funding Source:

ACT Community Services Directorate

Aim:

Family group conferencing is a strengths based intervention, first developed in New Zealand, which brings together families and their support systems to carry out plans that increases protection and care of children, young people and other family members.

This scoping paper reviews the Australian and international literature on family group conferencing, including different models being used and evaluations of these models. It provides advice for selecting families who may be suitable for Family Group Conferencing. It also provides an evaluation framework for the implementation of Family Group Conferencing in the ACT child protection system and for a longer-term study of effectiveness.

Outputs:

McArthur, M., & Winkworth, G. (2006). Family Group Conferencing. Scoping Paper. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Investigators:

Dr Gail Winkworth, Prof Morag McArthur

Funding Source:

ACT Community Services Directorate

Aim:

The 'principles for child-centred practice' provide a set of principles which can be used to evaluate the 'child centredness' of policies and procedures in child protection.

The ten principles are based upon four themes from the literature: the importance of recognising critical time-frames in childhood and adolescence, including assisting children and young people as early as possible; taking into account the developmental needs of children and young people in all interventions; providing children and young people with appropriate opportunities to participate in all aspects of child protection interventions which affect them; and promoting a collaborative approach to the care and protection of children, including the strengthening of networks that are critical to their well being.

Outputs:

Research monograph

Winkworth, G., & McArthur, M. (2006). Principles for Child-Centred Practice: Timely, developmentally appropriate, participatory and collaborative. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Associated publications

Winkworth, G., & McArthur, M. (2006). Being 'child centred' in child protection. What does it mean? Children Australia, 31(4).

Investigators:

Dr Tim Moore, Ros Morrow, Prof Morag McArthur, Debbie Noble-Carr, Jamie Gray

Funding Source:

ACT Community Services Directorate

Aim:

The purpose of this project was to develop an understanding of the needs and experiences of young carers in education, and to inform the development of school-based supports for young carers and their teachers.

Outputs:

Research monograph

Moore, T., Morrow, R., McArthur, M., Noble-Carr, D., & Gray, J. (2006). Reading, Writing and Responsibility: Young Carers and Education. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Associated publications

Moore, T., & Barry, E. (2014). Supporting Young Carers in Education. Research to Practice Series, Issue 6, September. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Moore, T., McArthur, M., & Morrow, R. (2009). Attendance, Achievement and Participation: Young Carers' Experiences of School in Australia. The Australian Journal of Education, 53(1).

Moore, T., & McArthur, M. (2008). Time to care: Young carers and education. Professional Educator; 7(2), 34-39.

Investigators:

Renee Crowe, Karen Coburn, Prof Morag McArthur, Dr Tim Moore, Vicky Saunders, Lorraine Thomson, Dr Gail Winkworth

Funding Source:

ACT Community Services Directorate

Aim:

This project assessed the Office for Children, Youth and Family Support's risk assessment framework, and its usefulness in identifying particularly vulnerable children. This research sought to inform the broader discussion in the ACT about integrated approaches to service delivery.

Outputs:

Crowe, R., Coburn, K., McArthur, M., Moore, T., Saunders, V., Thomson, L., & Winkworth, G. (2006). Vulnerable Children and Risk in the ACT. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

2005

Investigators:

Merrilyn Woodward, Prof Morag McArthur, Dr Gail Winkworth

Funding Source:

ACT Community Services Directorate

Aim:

The purpose of this evaluation was to review the operation of the Schools as Communities (SAC) program, which began in 2001, to determine how effectively it was achieving its objectives and intended outcomes, and to make recommendations about future program directions and management and staffing arrangements.

The evaluation involved a literature review, analysis of quantitative data, and analysis of interviews with a wide range of stakeholders including parents, principals and the SAC community outreach workers.

Outputs:

Woodward, M., McArthur, M., & Winkworth, G. (2005). Evaluation of the Schools as Communities Program in the ACT. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Investigators

Lorraine Thomson, Prof Morag McArthur, Rob Long, Prof Peter Camilleri

Funding Source:

Marist Youth Care

Aim:

This project for Marist Youth Care (MYC) comprised of two parts. A literature review canvassed the topic of what works in residential care. It identified key themes which emerged from the literature, and focused on the areas of care identified in the Looking After Children Framework. It also looked at literature about good practices in the leaving care process.

Secondly, ICPS facilitated a workshop with MYC to apply these themes to practice in their Compass Program and other programs for young people with intensive support needs.

Outputs:

Thomson, L., McArthur, M., & Winkworth, G. (2005). What works in residential care? A review of the literature. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Investigators:

Lorraine Thomson, Prof Morag McArthur

Funding Source:

ACT Health Directorate

Aim:

This project documented the partnership approach adopted in relation to three projects funded by ACT Health in 2004-2005 under the Strengthening Families measure. The 'Strengthening and Supporting Families Coping with Illicit Drug Use' measure was part of the Council of Australian Government's National Illicit Drug Strategy.

The report was based on consultations held with the four agencies involved (the three funded organisations and ACT Health) and focused on what was been learnt from the partnership approach adopted, to provide a foundation for future work.

Outputs:

Institute of Child Protection Studies. (2005). Strengthening Families Partnership Approach in ACT Consultation. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Investigators:

Dr Giovanna Richmond, Prof Morag McArthur, Dr Gail Winkworth

Funding Source:

ACT Children's Services Council

Aim:

Workforce planning is one of the key strategies available for ensuring that future staffing needs will be met. This paper explored workforce planning issues and opportunities for the care and protection system in ACT.

It reviews literature regarding generic workforce planning principles, frameworks and issues across sectors, including care and protection. It reports on consultations with some government and non-government organisations in NSW and the ACT on workforce planning, and suggests a methodology which could be used for mapping the current care and protection workforce in the ACT.

Outputs:

Richmond, G., McArthur, M., & Winkworth, G. (2005). Workforce Planning in the ACT Care and Protection System. Issues Paper. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Investigators:

Vicky Saunders, Prof Morag McArthur, Dr Gail Winkworth

Funding Source:

ACT Children's Services Council

Aim:

This paper provides a literature review on the issues related to employment screening, presenting information about alternative models, legislative schemes and frameworks and a range of practice issues involved in this strategy.

It presents a brief survey of the legislative approaches adopted by each of the Australian States and Territories, discusses the limitations to screening and briefly reviews alternative strategies for safeguarding children and young people.

Outputs:

Saunders, V., McArthur, M., & Winkworth, G. (2005). Screening of People Working with Children and Young People. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

Investigators:

Lorraine Thomson, Prof Morag McArthur, Dr Gail Winkworth

Funding Source:

ACT Community Services Directorate

Aim:

This report focuses on the need to provide stable and caring living situations for children in out-of-home care. It locates this issue within the broader child protection debates about family preservation and child safety. The report highlights the importance of stable and settled arrangements for the optimum brain development of young children. Research indicates the need to find flexible and developmentally appropriate solutions for achieving stability including family support, family reunification, kinship care, long term foster care, guardianship orders and adoption.

Outputs:

Thomson, L., McArthur, M., Winkworth, G. (2005). Good Practice for Placement Planning. Canberra: Institute of Child Protection Studies, ACU.

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