Is uni really for me?

At university, you’ll take control of your future. You can undertake a degree and subjects you’re passionate about, and have the flexibility to combine your studies with work or travel.

A university degree will provide you with the knowledge, skills and motivation to pursue the career you aspire to.

It’s a fact that university graduates are highly employable and generally earn more than non-university graduates – not just because of your qualification, but also the dedication and commitment you demonstrated to achieve your degree. Even if you don’t know where your career is headed now, the flexibility and diversity on offer at university can help guide you.

But it’s about more than studying.

You’ll have the chance to meet people from all over the world, and make friends for life. You may even take your studies on an overseas exchange to countries like Japan, the UK, Chile and France.

Clubs, organisations and sports teams abound – you’ll be able to help run them and even establish them.

At uni, you’ll develop skills that you will use forever – at work, at home, at play.

What about the workload?

As a uni student, you’re responsible for keeping up to date with your studies – your lecturers and tutors won’t manage your time for you, and they won’t chase you for assignments.

Depending on which course you choose, you may be able to squeeze all of your subjects into three days a week – but you’ll still be busy. You will need to read, research, review and ensure your assignments are completed on time – at uni, that’s your responsibility.

You’ll also have the flexibility of studying part-time – so you can earn more money, volunteer or pursue other passions.

The academic year

Your university year is usually divided into two semesters:

  • Semester 1 (starting February)
  • Semester 2 (starting July)

You’ll get a long summer holiday, as well as mid-semester and mid-year breaks.