Cities and successful societies

Published: Monday 28th November 2016

Want to find out what makes an urban society successful? Come along to The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) conference plenary discussion at the Melbourne Campus on Wednesday November 30.

The plenary discussion will focus on the theme of this year’s TASA conference, which is “Cities and successful societies”.

Speakers will discuss what makes an urban society successful, the relationship between “success” and the security, work and mobility of a city’s residents and the importance of inequality and social cohesion within an urban space.

They’ll also explore how Melbourne, often cited as the “world’s most livable city”, fits in to this debate, what “livable” cities have that others lack and what these measures of livability may conceal, including access to affordable housing or work/life balance.

The speakers will also discuss what large cities can learn from regional cities and vice versa and what we can learn from cities across Australia and the Asia – Pacific region.

These questions will be addressed by five guest speakers, each of whom bring a different perspective to the discussion.

The plenary speakers are:

  • Professor John Daley, CEO of the Grattan Institute
  • Professor Brendan Gleeson, FASSA, Director of the Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute, The University of Melbourne
  • Dr Yamini Narayanan, ARC DECRA Senior Research Fellow at the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation, Deakin University
  • Dr John Watson, Cities and Policy Editor, The Conversation
  • Dr Sally Weller, Visiting Professor, Institute for Religion, Politics & Society, Australian Catholic University.

The plenary discussion will be chaired by Adjunct Professor Lisa Heap, Institute for Religion, Politics & Society, Australian Catholic University.

Cities and successful societies: Insights from Australia and the region
When: Wednesday 30 November, 5pm to 6.30pm
Where: Cathedral Hall, ACU Melbourne Campus, 20 Brunswick St

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