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feedback iconThe Feedback Tool enables you to develop and deliver simple surveys to your students for the purposes of collecting feedback. Your Feedback survey can be anonymous, or you can log the student's name alongside their responses.

There a number of different question types available to you in the Feedback tool. These are explored at length in the LEO Guide: How to set up a Feedback activity. Once you have set up a Feedback activity and added questions to it, you are able to save it as a 'Template'. Saving a Feedback activity as a template will allow you to reuse that Feedback activity in other LEO units.

Analysis of the responses you collect using your Feedback tool are able to exported as an Excel spreadsheet. You can also view the responses online within LEO.

Possible uses for the Feedback activity with LEO include:

  • Anonymous interaction - an anonymous Feedback activity, with open-ended questions, will allow your students to ask questions which they may not feel comfortable asking in class.
  • Improving Instructional Design - you might like to think about using the Feedback tool to gather data for the purposes of improving your unit's content and instruction.
  • Unit evaluation - by adding open-ended questions to your Feedback activity, you can gather feedback on your unit's facilitation and delivery.

The Feedback activity can't be used for the purposes of assessment, as the questions you add it aren't graded. If you are interested in asking your students Quiz questions which are graded, you should consider using the Quiz activity.

The Feedback activity is very basic, and is made up of only a few simple features. A Feedback activity is made up of a variety of closed and open-ended questions, which can be combined in multiple ways. Question sequences can be saved as 'Templates' for reuse in other LEO units. You are able to export the results of your survey to Excel, or alternatively you can view the responses online within LEO. Surveys can be limited to a Group within your LEO unit as appropriate.

The benefit of using the Feedback activity in your LEO unit is that you are able to easily add a basic Feedback questionnaire to your LEO unit, for the purposes of gathering Feedback from your students. Another benefit is its simple interface.

If you want to add multimedia elements, embedded video, or links to external content, you are able to add these by adding a 'Label' to your Feedback activity. The Label within the Feedback activity operates in the same way as the Label you might add to your LEO unit!

Student views on the use of a flipped classroom approach: Evidence from Australia

This case study reports on the move towards a flipped-classroom approach was it was adopted in a compulsory final-year undergraduate subject at the Australian National University. The research was seeking to investigate the value students' put on the traditional lecture format, as well as to measure how students' perception of the flipped classroom environment change throughout and after a semester. This research tool place in semester 2, 2012.

The flipped-classroom approach consisted of making "high quality notes" available to students, which the lecturer would talk through. These notes also included worked examples of the concepts which were being outlined. The purpose of this exercise was to free up time during the lectures for more interactive activities.

Time was allocated at the beginning of every class for students to ask questions of their lecturer. Additionally, a Feedback tool was added to the Moodle site, to enable students to ask anonymous questions regarding the learning materials. The answers to these questions were either provided in class time, or via a Forum post.

Quantitative data collected from the students indicated that the flipped classroom approach "could be perceived as a positive approach due to its combination of activity and demonstration" (2014, 38). By the end of the semester, "over 75% of total respondents viewed the flipped classroom as being beneficial to their learning experience compared to a didactic lecture structure" (2014, 41).

Butt, A (2014) 'Student views on the use of a flipped classroom approach: Evidence from Australia', Business Education & Accreditation, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 33 - 44.