Law and Business

World-class partnership to benefit ACU researchers and students

Australian Catholic University (ACU) is delighted to announce a strategic partnership with Ghent University, Belgium.

The partnership will involve Study Abroad programs; staff and student exchange programs; collaborative research and curriculum development; and joint participation in internationally funded research projects.

The partnership was initiated by Professor Thomas Lange, Associate Dean Research, Faculty of Law and Business, ACU and Professor Alex Vanderstraeten, Director of Ghent University’s School for Social Profit and Public Management.

Professor Lange, a global research authority in Human Resource Management and Organisational Behaviour and Director (elect) of the Centre for Sustainable HRM and Wellbeing, said ACU was delighted to enter into a formal strategic partnership with Ghent University – one of the world’s leading research universities.

“This represents an important milestone on our continuing journey to embrace collaborations with the very best in the world and enrich the learning experience of both staff and students at all levels,” he said.

Professor Vanderstraeten said the partnership would extend Ghent’s global reach and deliver an international experience for staff and students which would prepare them for an increasingly international and globally integrated labour market.

Professor Vanderstraeten said the partnership is already working on several exciting opportunities including an International Research Symposium on Sustainable Human Resources Management and Employee Wellbeing in November 2015 and a PhD exchange program in 2016.

“These initiatives will help meet the increasing demand for universities to provide a truly global education experience. They will also support research activities targeting real-world problems, which are all too often too difficult to solve from a single institutional perspective,” he said.

A number of collaborative research projects are currently underway including research examining how expectation climate strength, defined as the degree of agreement among job incumbents on what is expected from them, breeds trust and strengthens employee performance. Professor Lange added: “A better understanding of performance expectations is vital to disentangle the relationship between line-managerial activities and the latter’s impact on employee reciprocity. To this end, expectations create not only employee trust and employer trustworthiness, but also underpin sustained employment relationships – a focal research component of ACU’s newly launched Centre for Sustainable HRM and Wellbeing.”